Susan Subtle

If you don't see your post here, try refreshing the page. Only posts with images or comments will appear.

If you're still having trouble, we apologize! We've been making some changes to the code so if you weren't able to post please try again. Or feel free to email us your message and we can post it for you. family@susansubtle.com
Updated by: Willy, 05-25-2020
Susie at the Thanksgiving table, 2009
Submitted by: Willy, 11-21-2020
Thanksgiving excitement! A wonderful evening with friends . . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
Thank you, Susie! You always made it special . . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
Thanksgiving . . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
A Thanksgiving memory. . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
Thanksgiving, 2016
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
Giving thanks in 2010 . . .
Submitted: 11-15-2020
Thanksgiving 2009
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
The table is set by Susie . . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
Warmth . . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
A plentiful Thanksgiving . . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
Thanksgiving memories at Susie's . . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 11-15-2020
Submitted: 10-28-2020
Susie on the KGO morning talk show - 1985
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 10-26-2020
Susie in Yellow - 1978
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 10-10-2020
Slice of life! Susie wears her beautiful tomato dress while enjoying a slice of pepperoni pizza for a project we were doing called "closet eater." Photo by Charlie
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 10-06-2020
Jules and Susie being "taped" at Normandy village ~ 1982 Photo by Charlie Denson
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 10-06-2020
A rainy day in Berkeley. Susie and her car. The echium lean into Panoramic way, Andris' orange truck sits in the background.
Submitted by: Willy, 10-05-2020
Submitted by: Nilva M. de Melo Brasil, 10-03-2020
Submitted by: Nilva M. de Melo Brasil , 10-03-2020
Susie on 2-18-1978 at Jose and Rebecca's wedding. Picture by Lynn Adler
Submitted by: Jose VILAR Segura, 10-02-2020
Susan in front of mirrored objects at Hello Again: A New Wave of Recycled Art and Design
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-30-2020
Hello Again: A New Wave of Recycled Art and Design
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-30-2020
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-30-2020
Clayton Bailey with Susie in the background at the opening of Hello Again in Los Angeles - 1997
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-30-2020
Clayton Bailey robot sculpture, flowers, Hello Again exhibition sign - Front desk
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-30-2020
Recycled Spool Furniture from the Hello Again: A New Wave of Recycled Art and Design show curated by Susan
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-30-2020
Recycled instruments from Hello Again!
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-30-2020
Susan in front of Leo Sewell's dog sculptures
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-29-2020
Susie in front of a tower of recyclables and recycling bins - “Hello Again: A New Wave of Recycled Art and Design.” - Barnsdall Art Park - 1997
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-29-2020
Susie leads a tour at the opening of "Hello Again!" at the LA Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles CA - 1997
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-28-2020
Ross Craig, Maria Eugenia Quintana, and Susan at the opening of "Hello Again!" at the LA Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles CA - 1997 The Hello Again! exhibition originated at the Oakland Museum, going on to show at L.A Municipal Gallery, Texas International Museum of Art & Science, Vancouver Museum, and the McColl Center for Art + Innovation, in Charlotte.
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 09-28-2020
Susie leading a tour at the opening of "Hello Again!" at the LA Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles CA - 1997
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-25-2020
Susan with Ben & Irwin Love ~ 1975
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 09-25-2020
Susie & Adi Gevins ~ dear friend, fellow accordion lover, giggling partner, and fashion cohort. - late 1990s
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 09-25-2020
Susan and Maria Eugenia Quintana
Submitted by: Hello Again!, 09-25-2020
Susan and dear friend Lloyd Watson on his 90th birthday - 2015
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 09-24-2020
Susan and Koos - Early 2010s
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 09-24-2020
Susan Subtle and fashion designer Koos Van Den Akker, 2010. Susan was a muse for Koos, he would send her the garments that were too wild and would not sell. She proudly wore everything he sent.
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 09-24-2020
Submitted by: Susie and Andy, 09-23-2020
Susie 1945
Submitted: 09-23-2020
Susie at nineteen.
Submitted by: Andy, 09-23-2020
Susan with flower vases
Submitted by: Subtle Archives, 09-23-2020
Susie Subtle and Charlie Denson, c. 1980. We visited my sister's ranch in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Miss you so much, Soosie. . .
Submitted by: Charles Denson, 09-22-2020
I’m so sad to learn that there is no more Susan Subtle in the world. The last time I saw her was in Vancouver. We went to hear Toots Thielmans play the harmonica and ended up in a flamenco bar where they locked the doors and danced on the tables. Thank you for making this beautiful web page.
Submitted by: Hank Bull, 09-09-2020
Susan’s striking pose and Tony with the violin that matches the bow.
Submitted by: Tony Hall, 08-25-2020
Susan meets Tony in Brighton & Hove City, UK. Thursday 31, March 2005. The photo originally posted with my memories is of Susan with her favourite matchstick instrument.
Submitted by: Tony Hall, 08-25-2020
I am saddened and shocked to learn about the untimely passing of Susan. My first contact with Susan was back in the early 2000’s after viewing online information about her first Hello Again! Exhibition. I remember seeing her telephone number being mentioned and called to see if she might be interested to be made aware of a collection of playable musical instruments entirely made with recycled matchsticks. From that day forward our relationship blossomed with emails and phone calls across the pond regarding my Dad’s work and in February 2005 Susan told me she was coming to London and could we meet in person if possible at my house to see his 1930s work for herself. I reside in Brighton & Hove City, it is a seaside resort and Susan told me, “I am from a seaside resort, Atlantic City, and I have always longed to go to Brighton.” Brighton is well in reach by car or train for a day return visit, so we arranged to meet on Thursday 31st March 2005. We had a lovely day and once back home in Berkeley Susan wrote, “It was wonderful to meet you and your wife, sister-in-law and son. I totally enjoyed my day with you. Thanks again and again for the lunch as well. I loved seeing your father's hand work and I look forward to having him participate in the Hello Again! exhibition.” I treasure these memories of “just an old-fashion gal” whose charming company we all thoroughly enjoyed on that special day. We stayed in touch over the following years and the most recent communication I received from Susan was a phone call 15, March this year about the progress of her Hello Again! Again exhibition. She was almost finished with the preparation of Hello Again! Again, and the proposal would be art directed prior to approaching museums in Berkeley, L.A., and Texas. I will never forget all the fond memories we shared over the years and will miss her zest for life and bright bubbly personality, this is how I will always remember her. Rest in Peace, Susan My heartfelt condolences go out to her family and friends. Submitted by: Tony Hall, 08-25-2020
Submitted by: Tony Hall, 08-25-2020
Puis, comme il detournait les yeux, il remarqua les Roubaud, pendant que Pecqueux continuait a lui raconter l'histoire, de quelle facon ces derniers etaient meles a l'affaire, leur depart de Paris dans le meme train que la victime, les dernieres paroles qu'ils avaient echangees ensemble, a Rouen. christian louboutin sale Cependant il y a un lien etroit entre la forme du cerveau chez les Mammiferes inferieurs les plus anciens (Monotremes, Marsupiaux, Prochoriateset chez leurs ancetres paleozoiques, les Amphibies du carbonifere (Stegocephaleset les Reptiles du permique (Tocosauriens).
Submitted by: Frederick, 08-17-2020
Subtle & Company stationery box
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
July 13, 1980: Susan in the middle Chloe Footstar Memorial Potluck Picnic, Portview Park, Oakland
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
July 13, 1980: Susan, Willy and Charlie, Chloe Footstar Memorial Potluck Picnic, Portview Park, Oakland
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
July 13,1980: Susan with Charlie Denson, Chloe Footstar Memorial Potluck Picnic, Portview Park, Oakland
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
1979 Susan with Spain, San Francisco
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
1979 me, Susan and Betty Bailey, San Francisco
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
1978 Jules Backus and Susan
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
Manitoba Museum of Finds Art We Accept Plastic exhibition announcement drawing by Ken Dollar
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
It could have been 1974 that Bonnie Hughes introduced me to Susan. We instantly became friends and she added me into the mix of her life with abandon. It was always a little hapless, and incredible. Susan was there for the Fat City School of Finds Art graduation ceremony performed by Lowell Darling in the Library of the SFMOMA on April 17, 1974 and many other countless events. Her plastic collection was a show at the Manitoba Museum of Finds Art in 1977, with a wonderful drawing by Ken Dollar for the announcement. This exhibition was much loved by the chairman of the board of trustees of the SFMOMA who had to pass through the exhibition to visit director Henry T. Hopkins (much to Henry's chagrin). Susan asked my mother to paint a picture of bamboo for her Subtle & Company stationery. And she made the first membership cards for the Manitoba Museum of Finds Art. Susan and her circle were an important part of my life in the Bay Area. Without that support, my life would be much less interesting.
Submitted by: Alberta Mayo, 08-06-2020
I only had a glimpse of the Susan Subtle that you all knew and loved. She was a patient at our Berkeley dental office for around 20 years, where I am currently employed for the past 13. It was always a joy to see her name on the schedule. She always had a smile, brought our office good cheer and laughter. Every office needs that! I always looked forward to see what she would be wearing. It always inspired me and my otherwise conservative office attire. One day she came in wearing peach polkadot pajamas and I said to her, “ Susan, those are so cute. I didn’t know I can wear pajamas to an appointment.” To which she replied, “ Sure, why not!” The next time she came in, she gifted me the exact pair. I will forever cherish it and the $2 bill she gave me a while back. She truly is an inspiration, to live life to its fullest, laugh and be happy. Rest in Peace, Susan.
Submitted by: Rose, 08-02-2020
"Hello Will - I came across this negative from the Hello Again! exhibition at the Oakland Museum. Most of the dresses were made by Charlotte Wilson who was Swedish and I saw her work in a Parisian dress shop. White tube, rusted bottle cap ball down, wine crate short dress, white safety pin dress, newspaper dress, Black ???? by artist x - stevens and Rubber tire w/spark plug buttons."
Submitted by: Photo by Ben Blackwell, 07-20-2020
Submitted by: Susan Subtle Archives, 07-20-2020
Submitted by: Susan Subtle Archives, 07-20-2020
Larry Fuente (b. 1947)
Mad Cad -1980-1984
Submitted by: Subtle Postcard Corp, 07-20-2020
Submitted by: Subtle Postcard Corp, 07-20-2020
Hello Again Mixes Fun With Serious Ideas About Recycling
https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1997-oct-22-ca-45242-story.html
By WILLIAM WILSON
OCT. 22, 1997
TIMES ART CRITIC
If the Municipal Art Gallerys going to have a popular hit this season it should be Hello Again: A New Wave of Recycled Art and Design. The exhibition presents about 1,000 objects ranging from monsters made of trashed auto tires to a couture evening gown fashioned from rusty bottle caps. There's a throne cobbled from wooden thread spools and furniture carpentered from a new kind of confetti-colored lumber that used to be plastic detergent bottles.
In short, this is the fun side of ecological disaster. Organized by the Oakland Museum, it’s the brainstorm of its guest curator, Berkeley journalist and product developer Susan Subtle Dintenfass. Somehow the provenance is just right. The Bay Area betrays a particular affection for revitalizing precious discards. Good thing there’s no catalog. That would wreck a pleasantly pixilated carnival ambience.
A grand entrance to the Barnsdall Park emporium is formed by bales of plastic wrap, newspaper and other salvageable stuff. It leads indoors to a ceremonial tower made of those magisterial green trash cans and yellow bins we all have in the backyard.
The show is parsed into thematic sections. The first reminds us there’s nothing new about recycling. A kind of historical hobo jungle, it contains folk art by tramps, prisoners and just about anybody with no money and a lot of discretionary time. Camel cigarette packs turn into origami containers. Thousands of wooden matchsticks make toys shaped like house, boat and grand piano. Wonder Bread wrappers are woven into rugs. Some clever soul mordantly made handsome lamps from artillery shells. Wooden cigar boxes are transformed into miniature furniture that looks like inlay from some exotic Arabian oasis.
At a glance it all recalls folk work made in Africa, Haiti or some other poor place. The resonance is especially strong in musical instruments of bamboo and gourd. Actually most pieces are anonymous, American and of recent date, confirming that this great nation has its own third world. The work is mesmerizing. It expresses a different conception of time, an obsessive determination to make something valuable out of other people’s trash. Admirable and sad, it makes much of the mainstream material look a little effete.
Artists called attention to America’s rising wastefulness in the Assemblage movement of the ‘50s. Local heroes like George Herms and Tony Berlant also are on board. They look a little too sophisticated here. More in the spirit of the thing are artists like Clayton Bailey. His aluminum utensil “Marilyn Monroebot” is estimably tasteless. Paul Di Pasqua’s “Salute to Mrs. --" depicts a mutant Mickey Mouse bricolaged of everything from Jell-O molds to pretty tin cans. Bob Kai Cheng’s “Berlin” captures the city’s tawdry soul in the jazz era. In fact much of the Assemblage has a retro-cartoon flavor nostalgic for the ‘30s.
Expensive designer fashions made from trash may appear a bit yuppified. Among many other things there’s chic S&M; wear from worn-out rubber tires, a spiffy jacket of old neckties, a shawl of shredded greenbacks and a slinky Jean Harlow cocktail frock made entirely of safety pins. Maybe the irony is intentional.
The lighting area is staged in a Moderne set-piece environment by designer Clare Graham. It’s so stylish it redeems some fairly gooney lamps. Out on the balcony one sees garden stuff. A fountain of cement and broken bottles in Watts Towers style is surrounded by robot insects the size of hogs. I didn’t notice any compost bins.
The design section is real clever. Wine goblets with bedspring stems and a footstool of coiled elevator cable are conversation pieces that leave one speechless. A chaise armored with a mosaic of soft drink cans is cute but how does it feel on a hot day? At the same time this is the place where recycled material is put to potentially practical use. High on recycling’s Most Wasted list, apparently, are those wooden pallets used to forklift building materials on construction sites. Made of perfectly good, study oak, they often wind up on landfills. Here the wood has been rescued to good purpose in tables and chairs.
Some consumer products on view betray no sign of using recycled material. A handsome kayak and couple of bikes look utterly new. Oh, goody. Let’s recycle so we can go right on consuming.
Entirely good-hearted, “Hello Again” is a perfect show for those of celebratory nature with a weakness for nostalgia, camp and funk. Recycling votaries too earnest to enjoy it are invited to a library provided for serious study.
* Municipal Art Gallery, Barnsdall Park, 4800 Hollywood Blvd., through Saturday, closed Mondays and Tuesdays, (213) 485-4581.
Submitted by: Los Angeles Times review, 07-17-2020
c. 1973
Submitted by: Ann, 07-13-2020
Susie's 1997 Hello Again! art exhibition was a groundbreaking triumph that the New York Times called "an exuberantly populist look at recycling." The show opened at the Oakland Museum and swept across the country to major museums in Los Angeles, Texas, Vancouver, and North Carolina. In her curator's statement, Susie declared that "the purpose of this exhibit is to highlight the surprising and growing number of innovative and artistic uses of recycled materials." And then she added: "The only message we want to get across: remember to reduce, reuse, and recycle — and have a good time!" Susie's projects always included a way to "have a good time." During the pandemic Susie stayed home working hard on her new version of the Hello Again show, scheduled to open in Texas in 2021. I visited with Susie for several hours on May 11 after she called to say she hadn't been feeling well that morning. She spoke with her doctor but did not want to go to the hospital. After a while she'd improved and then said that she was very excited about something she wanted to share with me. "This is the dress I want to wear at the opening," she said, and held out a photo of a model in a colorful outfit made of a rough fabric that turned out to be deflated balloons. I laughed and asked if the dress was recycled. She showed me another photo. "Of course it's recycled, look what it does!" The entire dress puffed up and inflated! A perfectly recycled garment that returned to its original form. It's sad that she never got to wear it, but somehow I can picture Susie in that radiant inflated balloon dress, floating across the gallery and up into the sky, smiling and laughing, and having a good time.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 07-12-2020
Susie, the wild child. .
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 07-12-2020
Susie with her aunt Helene and her brother John.
Submitted by: Andy, 07-05-2020
Submitted by: Betty Bailey Archives, 07-04-2020
Susan with Jen and Sara Levin
Submitted by: John Levin, 07-03-2020
In 1985 Susie had a regular spot on the KGO morning talk show, A.M. San Francisco, co-hosted by Jack Hanson and former Miss America, Nancy Fleming. On holidays, Susie would dress up in bizarre costumes, bring unusual product props, and give a surrealistic performance that's impossible to describe. The hardest part was getting Susie to the studio on time as she was not a morning person. I had to wake her up, drive her to the set, run through her script, and ease her stage fright. But once she was on camera, Susie was hilarious and totally unpredictable, a natural comedienne. Jack loved working with Susie but Nancy Fleming was usually horrified and uncomfortable. It was live TV, and one time Susie accidently stuck her hand into spinning blades while demonstrating a product and Nancy nearly fainted. Susie had an amazing tolerance for pain and went on with the show with her bloody hand as if nothing had happened. Most viewers thought it was a stunt but it was real! Another time composer Marvin Hamlisch was a guest, and when the show broke for a commercial Jack announced that Susan would be on next and Hamlisch instantly composed a little song on piano about "Crazy Susan Subtle." Susie tried to get the rights to it to no avail. I usually photographed the show and recently found some of these photos. On the Halloween show, Susie dressed as a giant pumpkin and played with a bony marionette. Nancy, at center, doesn't know why she has to hold Susie's inflatable skeleton on her lap.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-30-2020
A rubber chicken, plastic food, and trick light bulbs were props for Susie's April Fool's Day show.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-30-2020
KGO host Jack Hanson and Susie were a great team and really liked each other. The former TV weatherman was also a cartoonist and enjoyed the craziness of her performances.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-30-2020
A difference of style: Susie and Nancy Fleming in the KGO makeup room. Fleming was Miss America in 1961.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-30-2020
Susie in costume in the KGO dressing room. Her funny saddlebag purse is on the counter at right.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-30-2020
Susie had a script but once she was on camera, it was total improvisation!
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-30-2020
It's hard to remember the theme, but Jack and Susie were having fun. It was like I Love Lucy meets Monty Python.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-30-2020
During Susie's April Fool's Day show, Nancy Fleming (in the background) looked confused about Susie's props, which included a wine cooler in the shape of a toilet bowl.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-30-2020
Subtle began her journalism career in 1974 with an article in Esquire Magazine titled "Their Arts Belong to Dada" featuring west coast fashion and art. The article featured artists Clayton Bailey, Lowell Darling, Anna Banana, Ant Farm (group), Futzie Nutzle, Dr. Brute & Lady Brute, Mr. Peanut, Irene Dogmatic, AA Bronson, Captain Video, Flakey Rrose Hip, Henry Humble, The Gluers, and Dickens Bascom, Don and Rae Davis, and T.R. Uthco.
Submitted by: Willy, 06-29-2020
thanks so much for putting both this site and running the zoom meeting, If you are in brooklyn give me a call 6463215713
Submitted by: irv tepper, 06-28-2020
I was responsible for Susie's hairdo for the last 40 yrs. She always thought she looked like a society matron and would giggle about it because, of course, on the inside she was anything but! It was like she was the naughty girl on the inside but on the outside she was all proper! Susan and I had connections through other friends who have passed over the years, like our friend Bobby Bluechler and Norman. Susan was a wonderful godmother to Sidonie and immediately connected us to Sidonie's parents, Babs and Bernard because we both adopted our daughters around the same time. I had the wonderful opportunity to spend time with Sidonie and her parents, in Paris, being wined and dined in their very chic apartment. Susan had a very sweet spot for Sidonie and my daughter, as well. It seems very unreal that Susan is no longer with us, but the memories of her will live on forever! xoxo Elaine
Submitted by: Elaine Gerber, 06-27-2020
Tonight I made this collage from some of the memories of the historically significant and at the same time prescient “Hello Again” show emanating from the Oakland Museum in California and reaching out to major museums across the country. I’m so honored to have been selected to have my Film Jewelry piece (the blue necklace in the collage) thanks to Susan. The opening of this show (see the contact sheet in the collage) was one of the most spectacular ever in the SF Bay Area and well-known and lauded artists joined the 600 that were in the Oakland show when it travelled to around the country. (The excerpts and background are an article from the NY Times) Also as a result of this show, the LA Times featured my work (the yellow tinted picture) ~~~~~~ It was Susan’s open-minded adventurous spirit and “eye” that gave me a recognition I might not have otherwise been given and I thank you and join you to celebrate a one-of-a-kind curator and woman..
Submitted by: Harrie Schwartz - Mill Valley, CA, 06-27-2020
So kind, so funny, so original, so quirky. I always described Susan as a "connoisseur of the eccentric". She was always positive and supportive. A great pal. She will be sorely missed because she was truly irreplaceable. Nobody gave you the human feedback that Susan Subtle did.
Submitted by: Mike Shatzkin, 06-27-2020
Email us for the link
Submitted: 06-27-2020
Submitted: 06-27-2020
Susan Subtle and Mylez Brown - Golden State Warriors game - 2018
Submitted by: Willy, 06-27-2020
Susie was my beacon of how to live life with joy, playfulness & a little dose of fuck you. She was a mentor from the moment I had consciousness. I will miss you Susie Subtle.
Submitted by: Sara Levin, 06-26-2020
Susie chatting with a mermaid at Coney Island, 2004
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-26-2020
Jules Backus and Susie.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-26-2020
Susie and Mildred being silly.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-26-2020
Susan and my mom, Judith, at my 2005 wedding in Berkeley. (Only barely different than the one farther down this page captioned as including Naomi, but not mentioning the year or context)
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
Another already uploaded, just to expand on the caption. 1980, Susan and my mom, Judith Baker, as she files her dissertation in fulfillment of the requirements for her PhD...about 18 years after she entered grad school. In the sense that my mom had been collaborating as an equal with professors for years, the degree was a formality, and since filing was a completely bureaucratic event to which one wouldn't invite one's family, I think these photos never would exist but for Susan. As my mom's best friend, Susan knew how big a deal it was for my mom to have lifted this weight off her. I'm not sure, but I remember believing if not being told that the professional photographer was Susan's gift
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
The Normandy Village apartments, which Susan loved and lived in for 20 years, was designated a Berkeley landmark. Like the house she eventually bought and decorated on Panoramic Way, it testifies to her passion for surrounding herself in beauty and for her quirky arty taste--and shows that this thing about her went back a ways. (How far back others would know better than me. ) Here's some more about the building, a.k.a. Thornburg Village, after the architect http://berkeleyheritage.com/berkeley_landmarks/thornburg.html
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
I think this will be the last I'll try to share from the contact sheet of Susan in her Normandy Village apartment in Berkeley c. 1980. It occurs to me now that before these were taken she lived on the ground floor. That could have been as early as the late sixties, because I remember crawling in the courtyard as an infant...and that Susan paid (appropriately) peanuts in rent, thanks to rent control and how long she'd lived there
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
Susan in her Normandy Village apartment in Berkeley (enlarged contact sheet image) c. 1980
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
Susan in her Normandy Village apartment in Berkeley (enlarged contact sheet image) c. 1980
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
Susan in her Normandy Village apartment in Berkeley (enlarged contact sheet image) c. 1980
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
Susan looking out from her Normandy Village apartment in Berkeley (enlarged contact sheet image)
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
Just wanted to add some context to this already uploaded snapshot of Susan at my post-bar mitzvah luncheon in the very early eighties in Berkeley. Susan is hamming it up or else ostentatiously embracing her role as wing-woman to the host, my mom, by presenting here evidence of the quality of the spread and the catering. My mom had never hosted anything like this kind of thing, she was recently separated, and Susan was my mom's best friend.
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
(same)
Submitted by: Oliver , 06-26-2020
Susan in the late eighties or early nineties on one of my mom's visits back to the Bay Area, at the home of my uncle and aunt, where she often joined in family gatherings
Submitted by: Oliver, 06-26-2020
ROY DEFOREST AND JACK LEVINE DISCUSS DOGS, POLITICS AND ART -1998 - by Betty Bailey - Watercolor on paper. 11" x 14" Jack Levine, a famous New York painter, visits Susan often. She brought him out to see our house and studio and then we all went next door to visit Roy DeForest. Jack and Roy talked Art, Politics and Dogs. Jack does not like the country and probably won't visit again. Jack Levine, Roy DeForest, Josephine Rigg, Susan Subtle and Betty Bailey
Submitted by: Betty Bailey Archives, 06-26-2020
SUSAN SUBTLE AT THE WHITE ELEPHANT SALE - 1998 - by Betty Bailey. March 3, l998 - Watercolor Pencil on Paper l7" x l4"
Submitted by: Betty Bailey Archives, 06-26-2020
Susie riding a giant tortoise at Joshua Tree . . . (we weren't in a hurry. . .)
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-24-2020
Road Trip: In 79 or 80, we went to Zion National Park and had some lovely hikes. Susie loved the outdoors!
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-24-2020
Susie and Charlie on the road: We went to the Eastern Sierras on this trip and found so many unusual places and people. Susie loved traveling.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-24-2020
Road Trip: Back in the 80s, I took Susie to Lake Powell and we rented a boat and had a lot of fun on the water.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-24-2020
Road trip: Susie and I visited the old ghost town of Bodie.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-24-2020
On the road: Susie looking very cute in her leather jacket . . .
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-24-2020
Susan Subtle attends the funeral of an old friend. Watercolor on Paper by Betty Bailey - 14" x 20" TO COMMEMORATE A FRIEND'S LIFE: Susan told me this story. A friend who wore animal print clothes her whole life passed away. To commemorate her passing at the funeral, Susan and five other friends dressed appropriately. The other guests were quite amused.
Submitted by: Betty Bailey Archives, 06-23-2020
Susie and her Aunt Frankie and Cousin David
Submitted by: Andy, 06-22-2020
Oh no…life without our Susie, my Soozee is a nasty thing to contemplate. Soozee, you’ve got to always be here. You’re the only person who’s ever constantly surprised me; you pushed my brain farts furthest and loudest. The crazy worlds we created together, and our delight in them…alas. Ouch. Life’s Green Screen? All of us, your crazy friends, extended family; we’re lightening illuminations you ignited. Your awesome irreverence, Constantly creating contacts and wackadoodle in sacred scary electric beautiful and most frighteningly enticing environments. Lavender Leopard Ladies Who Lunch (with Helen and Olive). Hello Again, Again. And Again. Bed-top picnic Warrior-watching. Adoration of sumo rikishi physiques. Dream plans for 80th birthday camelback treks. We were the last fan-girls of Miss America. I miss you and honor you with every polka dot of my heart.
Submitted by: adi gevins, 06-22-2020
Susie and her nephew Matt - early 2010s
Submitted by: Willy, 06-22-2020
Susan, Franklin Mieuli, and Blake Green. Susie and Blake wear Koos Van Den Akker dresses.
Submitted by: Susan Subtle Archives, 06-22-2020
Lowell Darling, Susan Subtle, Clayton Bailey 2013
Submitted: 06-21-2020
Susie and her father, Arthur
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-14-2020
Susan's front door
Submitted by: Willy, 06-14-2020
Susie and Andy - October 2015
Submitted by: Andy, 06-13-2020
Susie's living room - September 22, 2019
Submitted by: Andy, 06-13-2020
Sunset from Susie's living room.
Submitted by: Andy , 06-13-2020
Susie arrived by chariot when she came to visit me in Coney Island . . .
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-11-2020
Susie and painter Jack Levine, San Francisco, 2003
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-11-2020
Susie and Charlie, "On The Road," Arizona Meteor Crater, 1979
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-11-2020
Susie and "Big Red"
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-11-2020
Submitted: 06-09-2020
Will try to pick one or two stories to share. Kathy Bridges, The Gone Girl
Submitted by: Kathy Bridges, 06-06-2020
Submitted by: Charle Denson, 06-06-2020
Susie and I went to visit Clayton and Betty. We ate chocolate cake with strawberries and Clayton and I played our harmonicas (until we were told to stop!). It was a lively afternoon.
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-06-2020
Susie and I met in the late 1960's. Susan introduced me to Raymond Saunders and Jacob Lawerence. I became friends with both and so many other wonderful and of quirky people. I made clothes for her during that time and curtains for her two different apartments on Spruce St. She and I along with Melinda Barbera would hang out at night. On a Susan's door was a sign that said day sleeper. The three of us would make dinner that would begin at 10:00 PM. When my twins were born Susan brought me a present-- an Album by the Chambers Brothers, Time. We talked several times a week about everything. She was certain that Trump would not be re-elected this year. We would go on and on about the sad state of the world. She loved my family and they loved her.
Submitted by: Mildred Howard, 06-06-2020
photo by Artist Raymond Holbert
Submitted by: Mildred Howard, 06-06-2020
Susie standing in front of Betty Bailey's drawings - U.S. Blues art gallery, Brooklyn, NY
Submitted by: Willy, 06-06-2020
Susie with Lewis Watts - 2014
Submitted by: Mildred Howard, 06-06-2020
Susie with Lewis Watts - 2014
Submitted by: Mildred Howard, 06-06-2020
An old clipping pinned above Susie's desk . . .
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-06-2020
Susie, Mildred Howard, and Mildred's grandson, Mylez Brown - Berkeley, 2018
Submitted by: Willy, 06-05-2020
Susan on her last Christmas (2019) at our house. She was adorned in various leopard skin prints, a very unusual shirt with a ruffled tail, and of course, out of frame, there were lots of polka dots on her socks and bag. As one of her gifts, she brought over one of her favorite catalogs, an entire catalog of brushes.
Submitted by: Jennifer Sharpe, 06-05-2020
Susie in a hammock
Submitted: 06-05-2020
Susan dancing with a stranger at the Ashkenaz, 2005. She twirled with such delight!
Submitted by: Jennifer Sharpe, 06-04-2020
Michael, Will, Susie, and Matt watching the sunset . . .
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-04-2020
Susie visits Coney Island!
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-04-2020
Mylez Brown, Susan Subtle, Xavier Brown, and Ed Gilbert of Anglim Gilbert Gallery - at Mildred Howard's opening - 2010
Submitted: 06-04-2020
Andy, Susie, and Matt
Submitted by: Willy, 06-04-2020
Susan and Clayton Bailey
Submitted by: Willy, 06-04-2020
Susie and an aeonium - a favorite succulent of hers for a period
Submitted: 06-04-2020
Susan's front door
Submitted by: Willy, 06-04-2020
flowers by Susan - July, 2018
Submitted: 06-04-2020
Susie and I in 1979 . . .
Submitted by: Charlie Denson, 06-01-2020
Susie and her succulents
Submitted by: Willy, 06-01-2020
Susie in her garden - 2010s
Submitted by: Willy, 06-01-2020
Susan was my friend for more than half a century. While I tore through many identities, she perfected a single unique and magical one. She made it look easy - to be in the moment while also attentive to the world she was shaping and sharing - her "projects," her home (a work of art in itself), her succulent garden, and her wonderful friends and family. Susan was the party, or perhaps the ringmaster who saw our gifts and pulled us into her Big Top. As she wished to be amused, one very much wanted to be charming and clever. Even those of us who were not in the habit of being joyful could rise to the occasion – making silly jokes, dancing, singing, and strutting our stuff. She loved us very much, and taught us by example that "being yourself" takes imagination, discipline, and a little help from your friends.
Submitted by: Anna Christensen, 05-31-2020
Up on the Roof ~ Susan Subtle, David Schwartz, Minerva & Louis Schwartz ~ Mid-90's
Submitted by: Monica Bradley, 05-30-2020
David and I met Susie in the mid-70’s through Jules. In recent years we shared a Cal Performance season subscription. About now we would be picking out what we would see for next season, either together, in dyads, or Susie would have something in mind for herself and a guest. No season for us next year due to the virus and now we have lost our dear, fun, Susan. Susan was a fiercely, loyal friend. Always looking for ways to connect people with someone she would know who could be helpful to a project or whatever she thought would be of benefit. She always remembered birthdays – in recent years with those crisp $2 bills. We have many tchotchkes gleaned by Susie – a plastic wind up Jimmy Carter peanut toy, a plastic cowboy boot cup to name a few, still hold places of “honor” on Arch street along with a ½ dozen packages of “Hello Again” postcards, a couple of “How to Have Fun With Your Body” books and more….Susie wasn’t only all about fun. About 15 years ago she helped me put together an event to raise funds for a nonprofit I worked for. Located in central Richmond it provided a range of services for homeless people, folks with mental illness, mostly minority and all down and out folks. Our Rubicon bakery provided jobs and training. To promote the mission, we put together a recipe contest, with the highlight, an event to announce the winner. Susie, contacted and brought in her chums, several high, profile food luminaries and artists, to help make the event a success. And we ate a lot of cake. I once heard that when someone dies, the part of who you were with that person also goes. I feel that with Susan, the loss of a certain irreplaceable playfulness. I miss her. I wish we had more time, but grateful for the time we had.
Submitted by: Sherry Hirsch, 05-30-2020
I ‘m still in shock about Susie’s passing since we are cousins & most recently friends after years separated & grew up together as children..... she made me laugh a lot which I cherish the most! Stupid talk & giggles really! I’m really sad to have lost her.......🧡💚❤️💜💙🤎😁
Submitted by: Beth Dintenfass, 05-29-2020
Joey Rigg and Peter Wilkie wedding reception party - Susan's house
Submitted by: Willy, 05-29-2020
Susan Subtle chats with Clayton Bailey - Roy DeForest show
Submitted by: Robin, 05-29-2020
Susan and Ann Harithas share a laugh
Submitted by: Family@SusanSubtle.com, 05-29-2020
Mildred Howard and Susan Subtle with family
Submitted by: Willy, 05-29-2020
Thanksgiving - Top: Susan (in dots), Charles Denson, Adi Gevins (also in dots), Chris Knowlton, Steve, Xavier Brown, Matthew Dintenfass - Bottom: Rio, Balazs Gardi, Shoka Javadiangilani
Submitted: 05-29-2020
Suzie loved polka-dots SF - 2009
Submitted by: Willy, 05-29-2020
Susie and dear friend Betty Bailey
Submitted by: Willy, 05-29-2020
Susan and Kate Canning on a boat - 2016 Photo - Charlie Denson
Submitted: 05-29-2020
One thing the obit didn’t mention was what a great mentor Susan could be, and was to me anyway. I never would have opened my little Garage Gallery without her enthusiastic encouragement. Her support included introducing me to artists like Robert Armstrong, Mark Bullwinkle, Lowell Darling, Irene Dogmatic, all of whom showed with me.
Submitted by: kjersten , 05-29-2020
Susan, Naomi, Ian - 1997 - Oliver Baker PhD party - North Berkeley
Submitted by: Oliver Baker, 05-28-2020
Susan Subtle and Tony Warren - 1995
Submitted by: Willy, 05-28-2020
Susie on a panel for Hello Again!
Submitted by: Willy, 05-28-2020
I apologize for the cryptic captions for the photos with my byline, and seeming lack of feeling. Actually those were kindly posted on my behalf, after I discovered that my own attempts had failed, and my notes with them were deleted. I'll come back to with more to say about them...if this note successfully uploads
Submitted by: Oliver, 05-27-2020
I am 39. I have known for at least a couple of decades that Susie IS one of the coolest humans on planet earth. And while she was alive, it was easy to define 'cool' as 'she knew amazing people.' Or 'oh my god, her house and all its art & objects are incredible! Oh and the view!' or 'she wears leopard print walking through a stuffy neighborhood.' And so on. ... but thinking more the past couple of weeks after reading an article on coffee she JUST sent. After JUST purchasing a lazy susan to put a TV on in our bedroom... I realized it wasnt all the cool shit she's done that made her so loved. It was how good she made her friends feel. The $2 bills; the meaningful little trinkets she found and sent; the postcards; the effort she made to make any visit perfect - beer, coffee, food, activities - always (maybe too?) well thought-out. The interest in my interests. She always made me feel special and loved. Thanks, Susie. Love you.
Submitted by: Chris, 05-26-2020
Susan at my Bar Mitzvah
Submitted by: Oliver Baker, 05-26-2020
Susan's apartment at "Normandy Village" a quirky landmark apartment structure in Berkeley that she lived in before rent control disappeared
Submitted by: Oliver Baker, 05-26-2020
Susan visiting Judith's Summer house on Grizzly Peaks
Submitted by: Oliver Baker, 05-26-2020
Naomi, Judith, Susan
Submitted by: Oliver Baker, 05-26-2020
Susan and I shared three icons: the moon, the giraffe and the elephant. We loved to categorize people we knew: on the earth, on the moon, and on the way to the moon. We considered ourselves both on the way to the moon, but she, the giraffe, was always stretching toward the moon, while I, the elephant, too often felt the tug of the earth.
Submitted by: Jan Tallman, 05-26-2020
Suzie on the phone
Submitted: 05-26-2020
Susan and Judith Baker
Submitted by: Oliver Baker, 05-26-2020
Thanksgiving table
Submitted by: Andy, 05-25-2020
Susie's colorful world
Submitted by: Ann, 05-25-2020
Susan and her flowers
Submitted by: Ann V. Dintenfass, 05-25-2020
Susan with Peter Wilkie
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-25-2020
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-25-2020
This is such a saddening shock. We are never ready for this, and given Soozie's zest and joy for life, it seems really really wrong. I say "Soozie" because I remember when we both got printed stationary as freshmen and she was Soozie and I was Lynda with a Y. That shows how young and sort of silly we were! We both played in the marching band at ACHS. We exchanged areograms during her first trip to Europe. I stayed over at her first apartment in NYC on my first solo trip to the big city. So sophisticated! She said she wasn't subtle but she was! Her sense of humor was keen, sly and knowing -- so tuned in to what few of us could see until she showed us it existed. I loved visiting at her parents' home and knowing both her brothers. She was eternally young and her delight in the ridiculous and the unexpected injected more fun and laughter in the world... exactly what we all need more of! She will be missed. I feel very, very sad.
Submitted by: Linda Arking, 05-25-2020
she lives on, her unforgettable infectious laugh, her joie de vivre, her unique style, her unbounded enthusiasm...
Submitted by: joe silk , 05-24-2020
I met Susan in 1967 In a Serbo-Croatian class, where whimsically we addressed each other in French. She was just shedding her Oxford life, her thesis on Yugoslav economics, and her philosopher husband, morphing into the future Subtle many of us knew and loved. At the time, she invited me on a road trip to LA. On the way back, driving through night at high speed in her tiny MGB, wind rushing past, semis looming on either side, Susan asleep in the passenger seat, I felt life so richly, joy so intensely, and I knew she had brought that about. So began my fifty plus years of Adventures with Susan and her power to light up life. I was a Sancho Panza to her Don Quixote, a Dr. Watson to her Sherlock Holmes, always intrigued, amused, amazed at her humor, her creativity, her quirks, her brilliance, her projects and her fabulous network of friends, until finally death did us part.
Submitted by: Jenny Jan Tallman, 05-23-2020
Submitted: 05-23-2020
Ode to the Subtle One There once was a Polka-Dot Lady who lived on a Hill... She welcomed us ALL and it sure was a thrill... The House was truly unlike any other - Filled with Life, Love and Art and occasionally her Brother. She entertained us all and knew everyone in Town... And was first in line at playing the Clown ! Polka-Dots were her game, the Warriors her muse - And her Leg-of-Lamb you couldn’t refuse ! Her Spirit and Energy inspired us all... And her delightful irreverence made us ball ! She was One-of-a-Kind T H A T’ S for sure... And now life without her is harder to endure. WE LOVE YOU SUSIE F L Y B A B Y F L Y Love from the Gualala Boyfriends Mike Steele Matt Batanian
Submitted by: Matthew Batanian , 05-23-2020
Big Red and company
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-23-2020
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-23-2020
Susie's garden
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-23-2020
Susie's wall
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-23-2020
Shoka, Balasz, Rio, Susie, Xavier - Thanksgiving 2016
Submitted by: Willy, 05-23-2020
My heart hurts, what an absolutely wonderful person. I had the pleasure of getting to know "Aunt Susie" over numerous gatherings of the Pot Pie Dinner Club back in my Berkeley days. Great food, exquisite company, wild conversation. Miss you Susie.
Submitted by: Houston Wilson, 05-23-2020
On a giraffe
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-23-2020
My SOUL Aunt Susan. Full Of Love,Light And Laughter. Always And Forever. Thank You From The Bottom Of My Heart. -XAVIER
Submitted by: Xavier, 05-22-2020
Anyone have a good photo of Susie in polka dots they can share? ❤️
Submitted by: Matt Dintenfass, 05-22-2020
Susan and Jose
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-22-2020
Susan was absolutely unique. She will be missed by many.
Submitted by: Christy Knowlton, 05-22-2020
I have so many memories after 50+ years of Susie. They have been flooding my thoughts these late few days. I will sort through them and make a bouquet as we create this together. Thank you for starting this.
Submitted by: Jenny Jan Tallman, 05-22-2020
I met the Subtle One in 1978. She immediately took me under her expansive wing and has been my mentor, confident, most loyal friend and playmate for the past 40 years. Hard to imagine a world without her.
Submitted by: Joey Rigg, 05-22-2020
View from Susie’s garden.
Submitted by: Andy, 05-20-2020
This is a birthday letter from Susie. (I sent her the moon stamps.) Contents: two new 2 dollar bills and a recipe for chocolate prune loaf. I wish there were more letters in the mail.
Submitted by: Ann V. Dintenfass , 05-20-2020
Picture from an early Arch st. Halloween Party with Jose Vilar

Susie & Ornette- Back in the day I drove Susie to Davies Symphony Hall for a tribute concert to Ornette, who was still alive at the time. After the concert we went back stage and Ornette (whom I had never met before) for whatever reason goes down on a knee and kisses my hand (I was about to shake his) a complete surprise to me but I kissed his in return... it was just another "Subtle" moment.
Submitted by: david richman, 05-19-2020
Susan, Nikki Bridges, and ____ (let me know if you know who the third person is family@susansubtle.com)
Submitted by: Willy, 05-19-2020
Susan and British philosopher Paul Grice
Submitted by: Willy, 05-19-2020
Suzie and her nephew Matt at a Pakistani restaurant
Submitted by: Willy, 05-19-2020
Suzie, her good friend Charles Denson, and a llama
Submitted by: Willy, 05-19-2020
I never knew Susan Subtle but did know Soozie Dintnefass! We were ACHS classmates and friends 60+ years ago! She had the spark and edgy wit that must have continued to grow into the very special person she became. My condolences to her family and friends. Sheila Avrin McLean
Submitted by: Sheila Avrin McLean, 05-19-2020
Lots of pleasant memories of Susie.Her upbeat, fun spirit left a happy mood on everyone. Sending hugs & sympathy to her close friends and family.
Submitted by: Barbara “ Bobbi” Kaplan Moskowitz, 05-18-2020
Just a ps. Susie was our own Annie Hall.
Submitted by: Vicki Gold Levi, 05-18-2020
I will always remember Susie as a warm wonderful friend with so much to offer! We haven’t been I touch for a very long time but her memory is one I will always cherish!! May she Rest In Peace!!
Submitted by: Millie Belber Becker, 05-18-2020
Unforgettable high school classmate who was always unique and fun. RIP❤
Submitted by: Shirley Chudnow Malitz, 05-18-2020
Susan was an original. She was a creative, out of the box thinker. She was also a wonderful friend. We have been in touch since grammar school. In the late seventies we collaborated on the book “Atlantic City:125 Years of Ocean Madness.” She will be missed by many, including me. A final thought. When my mom died in 1991 in San Francisco, Susie knew she loved leopard, so she came to the funeral as a tribute, donned in fake leopard. That was Susie! Vicki Gold Levi
Submitted by: Vicki Gold Levi , 05-18-2020
Lots and lots of loving phone calls.
Submitted by: Unknown Caller, 05-18-2020
Susan's home where she loved to host her friends
Submitted: 05-17-2020